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On September 12, 2010 delegates from the American Organization for Nursing Leadership and their guests embarked on a trip halfway around the world to meet with nurse leaders in India through the People to People Citizen Ambassador Program. AONL president, Pamela Rudisill, MSN, RN, MEd, NEABC, and AONL chief executive officer (CEO), Pamela Thompson, MS, RN, CENP, FAAN, led the delegation's meetings with counterparts in Delhi, Jaipur and Agra. The trip was filled with dialogue about health care and nursing leadership in the United States (U.S.) and in India.
The Nurse Executive Competencies describe skills common to nurses in executive practice regardless of their educational level or titles in different organizations. They are presented as information for both nurse leaders, those whom they employ, or work with them.
🔒Member Only🔒 Technology is integrated into the fabric of health care and has become part of the core fiber. AONL recognizes the significant role technology plays. In support, AONL leadership has developed several tools to assist nurse leaders in incorporating technology into their work.
🔒Member Only🔒 This guide helps facilitators host a guided conversation between clinical nurses and nurse managers.
These guiding principles outline how chief nurse executives, chief information officers and industry partners stakeholders can work together to achieve enhanced quality outcomes for the patients and families we all serve.
Learn about the expectations, assumptions, and challenges facing the multi-generational workforce of early-careerist nurse leaders.
In 2017 a delegation of nurse leaders traveled abroad, to Israel with the AONL board president an CEO. Among the areas they explored included, emergency preparedness, treating victims of violence in Israeli communities, and Israeli nurse leaders’ initiatives to keep themselves and their staff resilient. Additionally, they learned how nurse leaders in Israel partner with their academic colleagues in preparing the current and future generation of nurses for the growing demand of health care needs as their population ages.
🔒Member Only🔒 This book explores the need for nurse leaders to support the development of a culture of communication from the administrative level to direct-care nurses.
Communicating internally and externally is one of the most difficult, yet critical, responsibilities leaders face. As our nation learned during Hurricane Sandy, the Boston Marathon bombing, the Ebola outbreak in Africa and other major crises, frequent communication and full disclosure is essential to maintaining credibility with the organization’s interprofessional team and the public. What is said (or not said) can be as important one’s actions.
Health care systems increasingly are identifying strategies and interventions to improve the health of their patients and the communities they serve. Acute, ambulatory and post-acute care organizations are realizing the promotion of health and wellness outside their settings creates improved outcomes. This shift in care delivery focuses on partnerships across the health care settings and addressing specific health needs of particular populations.
The Nurse Manager Competencies are based on the Nurse Manager Learning Domain Framework and capture the skills, knowledge and abilities that guide the practice of these nurse leaders. The successful nurse leader must gain expertise in all three domains: the science of managing the business; the art of leading the people; the leader within.