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According to the AACN-AONL task force that developed these guiding principles, an academic-practice partnership is a mechanism for advancing nursing practice to improve the health of the public. Such intentional and formalized relationships are based on mutual goals, respect, and shared knowledge. An academic-practice partnership is developed between a nursing education program and a care setting. Such relationships are defined broadly and may include partnerships within nursing, and other professions, corporations, government entities, and foundations.
According to the AACN-AONL task force that developed these guiding principles, an academic-practice partnership is a mechanism for advancing nursing practice to improve the health of the public. Such intentional and formalized relationships are based on mutual goals, respect, and shared knowledge. An academic-practice partnership is developed between a nursing education program and a care setting. Such relationships are defined broadly and may include partnerships within nursing, and other professions, corporations, government entities, and foundations.
The care delivery system of the future will be characterized by vast complexity due to use of sophisticated technology, aging of the population with the associated growth in chronic health issues, as well as diversity of patient populations and practice settings.
🔒Member Only🔒 Technology is integrated into the fabric of health care and has become part of the core fiber. AONL recognizes the significant role technology plays. In support, AONL leadership has developed several tools to assist nurse leaders in incorporating technology into their work.
Clinical nurses and nurse managers, like athletes or artists, work together with the shared goal of high quality patient care. The shared goal is clear to nurses, and most of them might say they would not be in nursing practice without that endpoint in mind.
Patient engagement is a critical cornerstone of patient safety and quality. AONL, along with the Nursing Alliance for Quality Care, has grounded its approach to this topic by recognizing the primary importance of relationships between engaged patients and families and their providers of care. The following are principal assumptions that guide in addressing care that is patient-centered.
In September 2011, The American Hospital Association (AHA) convened a roundtable of clinical and health systems experts to examine the future primary care workforce needs of patients, as well as the role hospitals and healthcare systems can play in effectively delivering primary care.
🔒Member Only🔒 This guide helps facilitators host a guided conversation between clinical nurses and nurse managers.
These guiding principles outline how chief nurse executives, chief information officers and industry partners stakeholders can work together to achieve enhanced quality outcomes for the patients and families we all serve.
This white paper contains both important data and insights as well as an assessment tool that will help organizations develop effective WPMs and support excellent patient care and strengthen the U.S. health care system.
Learn about the expectations, assumptions, and challenges facing the multi-generational workforce of early-careerist nurse leaders.
This Community Health Worker toolkit will cover what Community Health Worker programs are and what is suggested to implement a program on your own as well as the benefits to your organization, your patients and your community.
As a coalition of 61 national nursing organizations, the Nursing Community stands united that the focus on responding to the Ebola Virus Disease in the United States and the devastating outbreak in West Africa must be on patient health and community protection.
AONL, with the Tri-Council for Nursing, released a position statement on how to engage the nursing workforce in eradicating the Ebola virus.
AONL and the Emergency Nurses Association created the Guiding Principles on Mitigating Violence in the Workplace to assist nurse leaders in systematically addressing measures to manage and reduce violence against health care professionals.
Information gathered from the AONL and the Emergency Nurses Association Guiding Principles on Mitigating Violence in the Workplace have been organized in a toolkit for nurses to mitigate violence in the workplace.
AONL and the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing collaborated to outline how nurse leaders in inpatient and post-acute/outpatient settings should approach their roles to enhance development of care coordination and transition management across the continuum of care.
[Advertisement] In a recent study of more than 1,200 clinicians, 87 percent say that alarms for non-actionable, irrelevant issues “occur frequently,” a jump of more than 10 percent in five years. The problem is growing with the proliferation of monitoring devices in hospitals. It’s time to make alarm management a priority, to protect patient safety and to mitigate provider burnout.
[Advertisement] Whether it’s a local clinic with a team of ten employees or a healthcare system with multiple locations, every healthcare facility relies on its staff to deliver exceptional care 24/7. Issues such as patient acuity, census counts, and shift requirements must be considered when creating staff schedules. Factor in call offs, time-off requests and other last-minute changes, and it’s easy to see why staff scheduling can be a time-intensive, laborious process for nurse managers.
AONL is committed to safe nurse staffing to ensure quality care and optimal patient experience is delivered throughout our nation. The number of patients for whom a nurse can provide safe, competent and quality care is dependent upon multiple factors. Studies show nurse staffing levels are a determinant of patient safety, outcomes, satisfaction and nurse well-being